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Clarke Offers Newest, Most Advanced Choice for Effective Mosquito Control

The mosquito bounty hunters are on the scene! Once again proving that it hates mosquitoes, Clarke, a global environmental product and services company in Roselle, Ill., is launching EarthRight™ in three Chicago-area communities – Fort Sheridan, Lake Bluff and Lincolnshire. The groundbreaking service respects the environment by effectively pairing two products with earth-friendly applications, including bicycles. An industry first, the products are Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) Listed®, which means they can be used in and around organic gardens and farms. The company plans to roll out the service nationwide in 2013. This is also National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, which runs through Saturday. (Clarke photo by AJ Kane.)

The mosquito bounty hunters are on the scene! Once again proving that it hates mosquitoes, Clarke, a global environmental product and services company in Roselle, Ill., is launching EarthRight™ in three Chicago-area communities – Fort Sheridan, Lake Bluff and Lincolnshire. The groundbreaking service respects the environment by effectively pairing two products with earth-friendly applications, including bicycles. An industry first, the products are Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) Listed®, which means they can be used in and around organic gardens and farms. The company plans to roll out the service nationwide in 2013. This is also National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, which runs through Saturday. (Clarke photo by AJ Kane.)

CHICAGO (June 25, 2012) – Tired of swatting and scratching or retreating indoors when you’d like to just enjoy being outside?

Once again proving that it hates mosquitoes, Clarke is launching EarthRight™, a groundbreaking service that respects the environment by effectively pairing two products with earth-friendly applications (think bicycle). This is also National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, which runs through June 30.

Clarke, a global environmental product and services company with main offices in Roselle, Ill., is pilot-testing EarthRight™ in three Chicago-area communities – Fort Sheridan, Lake Bluff and Lincolnshire. The company plans to roll out the service nationwide in 2013.

By advancing existing science one step further, EarthRight™ pairs Natular® larvicide and Merus™ adulticide to effectively snuff out larvae and adult mosquitoes. An industry first, the products are Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) Listed®, which means they can be used in and around organic gardens and farms.

Imagine locating a mosquito by GPS. EarthRight™ takes full advantage of GPS technology to efficiently route field technicians to monitor breeding sites and treatment locations. It also incorporates earth-friendly applications for mosquito control, including bicycles, small-footprint trucks and electric applicators for night-time treatments. Helicopter applications reduce the impact on hard-to-reach sensitive environments. Prius hybrid cars transport the bike fleet and crews.

“Effective results using OMRI Listed® products and more sustainable delivery methods mean communities will like having us around,” says Lyell Clarke, president and CEO. “EarthRight™ also offers plusses in value-added communications, a contemporary look and a choice for communities and municipalities that are working hard to uphold their standards for protecting the environment.”

Natular® won the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 2010, and was the first “Reduced Risk” larvicide that EPA registered. It also was the first new active ingredient for public health in nearly three decades. Merus™, with an active ingredient derived from chrysanthemum flowers, is the first OMRI Listed® adulticide for wide-area mosquito control.

EarthRight™ combines effective mosquito control with sustainable benefits for the environment and community – and that means a less itchy night at the grill is in your future.

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