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One more drink — for your evergreens!

                                                                  One Good Drink!                   Have Your Evergreens Stored Enough Water to Get Through the Winter?                                                          Take Precautions Now. Winter’s dry temperatures can cause root damage in trees and shrubs. This can significantly impact the health of evergreens which continue to lose moisture over the winter. Libertyville based Rosborough Partners, Inc., a landscape design, build and maintenance company, recommends the following. Give evergreens one last deep drink of water. Broad-leaved and needled evergreens need moisture to build up their winter reserves. Since evergreens retain their foliage during the winter, sunny and windy winter days may cause excessive transpiration (water being lost through the foliage). The water needs to be thoroughly absorbed up into the plants when winter really hits. If feasible, it is good to water again during any warm spell during the winter months. Rosborough’s Mark Opal, Plant Healthcare Specialist says, “A dry plant is a stressed plant and a stressed plant becomes unhealthy. That may require pesticides to maintain and restore good health. Adding adequate water this time of the year prepares the plant to help it through the winter season and ensures a healthy plant as spring arrives. That means it can use its own natural defense against pests and reduces any pesticide that may be required.” A very simple method to test the moisture around plants is insert a stick, a long thick screwdriver, or a root feeder 12 inches into the root zone. If the shaft is dry when pulled out the plant needs water. Roots need moisture around them as the ground freezes otherwise they 'freeze-dry'. Evidence of dried, dead roots may not be present until late next spring when evergreens mysteriously brown out, or trees do not fully leaf out, despite a wet spring. Consider anti-desiccant sprays for evergreens to reduce moisture loss. This is a waxy coating that dries to a clear finish. You often see it used on real Christmas trees. Rosborough recommends treating the evergreens in the beginning of December with the application expected to last all season. Should it get warm and wet during the winter, a second application may be needed. Additional mulch protection around the root systems helps hold the moisture in the soil. Be careful not to make the mulch more than 2-3 inches or rodents and other animals will burrow in there. Rosborough Partners, Inc., http://www.rosboroughpartners.com, strives on excellence down to the last detail with unparalleled service for landscape architecture, residential/commercial garden design/construction and site management. Call Rosborough Partners, Inc. at 847 549 1361 for more information.

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