Advertisement:

Hyperconnected: Brain gain or drain?

David Macias has five personal electronic devices: a laptop, smartphone, e-reader and not one but two iPods — one for his car, one for workouts at the gym. "I have trouble sleeping sometimes," the 19-year-old college freshman said while taking a break from watching a movie on his laptop in the College Of DuPage cafeteria. Macias said he sleeps with his cellphone, which wakes him when he receives a text. "It's crazy," said Macias, of Aurora. "I've got to turn it off." Macias and others his age and younger are a growing concern because of their "hyperconnectivity." The word describes the constant connection to electronic devices as practiced by many of the so-called millennials, the generation born from 1981 to 2000 who came of age in the new millennium. But a Pew Research Center survey released Wednesday shows that 55 percent of Internet experts and scholars believe that electronically connected youth "will be nimble analysts and decision makers" who benefit from the practice. Slightly more than 40 percent of those same experts had the opposite perception, contending that hyperconnected young people cannot retain information, are too distracted, and lack "deep-thinking capabilities" and "face-to-face social skills." Read more at the Chicago Tribune.

Share this story

Advertisement: